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Dasani Water Will Soon Be Sold in Aluminum Cans

Coca-Cola is stepping up its green initiative by giving a makeover to its Dasani brand, which is the best selling bottled water brand in a country where bottled water is the best selling beverage.

Dasani Water Will Soon Be Sold in Aluminum

The beverage giant will start to sell Dasani water in aluminum cans next month in the Northeast and plans to expand distribution to other parts of the country by 2020, according to Bloomberg. Aluminum bottles will follow the aluminum cans. Worldwide, aluminum is exponentially more likely to be recycled and to be made from recycled material. Additionally, aluminum is far less likely to end up in oceans and rivers.

Coca-Cola’s packaging follows a move by its chief rival PepsiCo, which announced it would sell its water brand, Aquafina, in cans at restaurants and arenas. Dasani and Aquafina are the country’s top two water brands, in that order, with combined sales of more than $2 billon per year, according to Bloomberg.

The change to Dasani’s packaging could help Coca-Cola eliminate 1 billion virgin plastic bottles, made with non-recycled plastic, from its supply chain over the next five years, according to CNN.

“We are a consumer company, and as consumers say, ‘Well, we’d like to try cans,’ we’re going to put cans in the market,” said Bruce Karas, vice president of environment and sustainability at Coca-Cola, as Fast Company reported.

Dasani will still be available in plastic bottles too, but, as part of Coca-Cola’s “World Without Waste” initiative, it will reduce the amount of plastic in those containers through a process called light-weighting. The company is also unveiling a new hybrid bottle made with up to 50 percent recycled plastic and renewable, plant-based materials, according to CNN.

Additionally, Coca-Cola will also test a new Dasani vending machine that requires customers to bring their own bottle if they want water or seltzer. The company will issue 100 machines, called PureFill, to test out if customers respond well to it and help Coke deal with its plastic waste problem.

READ MORE AT EcoWatch.com